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>>> on the broadcast tonight, a deal. is it possible on big things like medicare, social security and taxes? there are rumblings out of washington tonight about actual cooperation. >>> sentencing day for casey anthony. the judge in her murder case seemed to be sending her a message. >>> is nothing safe the huge scandal over a newspaper hacking into people's electronics and now the equally big consequences. >>> and could it really be the end? has harry potter's final chapter actually arrived or could there be more? >>> plus here tonight for all those who remember penmanship, there's a new sign the handwriting may be on the wall. there's a new sign the handwriting may be on the wall. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. it may go all the way back to their meeting on the golf course, for whatever reason, president obama and speaker of the house boehner have forged something of a relationship, while not the best of friends, they are dealing with each other across the enormous and venomous partisan divide that has divided washington to the point of paralysis. knowing a deadline
the earth says we're making a big mistake. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening, our lead story tonight is in the what will they think of next category, on it's deadly serious because it has to do with the latest ways terrorists are figuring out to bring down an aircraft. we talk a lot about airline security, what gets through, what doesn't. and this scenario, a warning by the feds, may be the nightmare scenario. explosives inside a passenger, surgically placed within the body of a living human being who is willing to give their life to the cause. it's a grisly business, but just the threat of it could change air travel. we want to begin tonight with our justice correspondent, pete williams, at national airport in d.c. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, officials stress tonight there's no indication of any plot under way to actually do this, but they say al qaeda operatives have talked about trying to find doctors to help them do it, and the u.s. is taking that talk seriously. it's renewed interest in an idea for evading
the nation and getting worse before it gets better. >>> closing court a big city has to turn people away because the money has run out. is this any way for courts in america to do business? >>> family ties. if you have the gene that raises your risk of alzheimer's disease, would you want to know about it? tonight the story of a family that had to make that decision. >>> making a difference for noble animals that deserve a better life. >>> and coming in for a very last time. >>> and coming in for a very last time. nightly news begins right now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. they tell us the scientific explanation is this. high pressure compressing the air, cooking the air and ramming it down on top of us and holding it there. but here's the real problem. there are now 34 states where there are heat advisories or heat warnings. one million square miles of our country where folks are being warned about the heat tonight. this heat, the severe heart of it, affects 141 million americans as it's moved over big population centers, we can see how it's gotten wors
vehicle is on its last few laps and a big part of american life is about to end. we begin our coverage tonight with nbc's tom costello who was lucky enough to watch it blast off at the cape today. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian. mission managers admit they got lucky with the weather, no rain, no lightning, even a last-minute technical glitch didn't teach "atlant "atlantis" on the ground. for the last time, a farewell from the ground teams who have spent 30 years launching shuttle missions. >> on behalf of the greatest team in the world, good luck to you and your crew on the final flight of this true american icon. >> go flight, one more time, mike, witnessing this nation at its best. the crew of "atlantis" is ready for launch. >> reporter: liftoff, the final liftoff of "atlantis." >> reporter: the 135th shuttle mission thundered off the florida coast on a resupply mission to the space station. while on the ground, three-quarters of a million people gathered to witness history. >> i wish them god speed and i'm so proud, i'm happy to have seen them go out. >> reporter: but con
is coming and they have to solve the problem of the nation's debt limit, they have to go into some big ticket items like social security, medicare and taxes. it is progress with no guarantee but nothing else has worked so far. and we begin tonight at the white house with nbc's kristen welker. kristen, good evening. >> reporter: president obama emerged after talks with congressional leaders saying both sides are deadlocked but are determined to make a deal very soon. lawmakers will work through the weekend and meet with the president again on sunday. the president and congressional leaders come together to hammer out a deal on the debt ceiling. if a deal isn't hammered out by august 2, the -- president obama called the meeting very constructive, but admitted hard work remains. >> i want to emphasize that nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to and the parties are still far apart on a wide range of issues. >> reporter: administration officials say the president is pushing for a big deal, somewhere in the ballpark of $4 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade, nearl
wing here, how big is this pool of people that could produce such a person? >> that pool of people i would say is very, very limited. what we see here is a rather extreme single instance rather than something representative. >> reporter: the maximum punishment in norway for any crime is 21 years in prison. if convicted, the 32-year-old suspect will be back on the streets when he's 53 years old. the suspect's lawyers said that the suspect is willing to appear in court here in oslo on monday, and explain why he did it. and the lawyers said that the suspect will say that what he did was, quote, atrocious, but necessary. lester? >> martin fletcher in oslo tonight, thank you. norway hasn't known this kind of terror since world war ii. it's a place where gun violence is rare and bombings are virtually unheard of. now oslo takes its place in a long list of places forever scarred by large scale mass murder. tonight, michelle franzen with the survivors' stories. >> reporter: as the search for victims continues, a very different search is under way at the place where families have come to iden
, the big bureaucracy they have become, and questions about imagination and common sense and how safe we really are given their $8 billion budget. it's where we begin tonight with nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: with its tactics already making it one of the most ridiculed government agencies, members of congress today interrupted and taunted a top tsa administrator, even arguing amtrak police dogs would do a better job of explosive detection than the tsa's airport scanners. >> you give me one of his dogs and we will find that bomb before you find your bomb. >> reporter: the tsa today acknowledged 2,500 security breaches since the agency was founded in the months after 9/11. but that's over 10 years after 450 airports, on average, 5 1/2 breaches per airport per year, everything from a misplaced bag to doors left open and passengers walking into secure areas, but also more serious scenarios, like the man who flew across country on an old boarding pass and expired id. the stun gun found on a jetblue flight last week. while the tsa conducts security reviews of every airport every year, it t
have a responsibility to come together and solve the problem. >> reporter: and one of the big issues for democrats is they say the republican plan would sort of expire before the president's re-election campaign, with another vote to raise the debt ceiling again, they say that would put us right back here. republicans say they need to guarantee that cuts would actually happen in the future to prevent more of a crisis. now, after all this wrangling, aides tell me the senior level negotiators in both parties are still talking, trying to find a way to close the gaps. and as you mentioned, brian, speaker boehner will follow the president tonight. he'll speak for about five minutes to lay out why he thinks his plan should get the public support. brian? >> kelly o'donnell setting the stage on capitol hill for us tonight. kelly, thanks. >>> our chief white house correspondent political director chuck todd is with us tonight from the white house. chuck, it seems to me there are almost two planes going on here. number one, the problem itself, and it couldn't be more important the various plan
't answer. i don't know. >> reporter: at one point, murdoch claimed his company is too big for him to know the details of each business. >> "news of the world" say small percent of our company and i'm employing 30,000 people around the world and i'm spread watching and appointing people in my trust. >> reporter: james defended executives rebekah brooks who resigned last friday. both led british newspaper's arm. >> there's no evidence that i'm away of that ms. brooks or mr. hinton or any of those executives, had knowledge of that. nonetheless, those resignations have been accepted. >> reporter: later in the day, brooks faced questions by herself from the same panel. she was arrested on sunday over allegations of phone hacking and payments to police for information. she, too, denies any knowledge of wrongdoing. >> i have never paid a policeman myself. >> reporter: but for the murdochs today's questioning was about salvaging news corp.'s reputation, a business rupert brought up with one paper. >> i was brought up by a father who was not rich but a great journalist. before he died, it was a sm
rupert murdoch's vast media empire. which includes some big brand names in this country. cnbc's david faber joins us in new york for some insight. david, this has now reached to one of murdoch's top deputies. what does this do to his damage control efforts. >> he's been trying to do damage control since the middle of last week in some ways when he finally started to distance himself from rebekah brooks who resigned, of course, a couple days later. the scandal does not appear to have crested yet. despite giving up the purchase of b sky b for what would have been a $12 billion deal for news corp., a huge important deal they wanted to complete in the uk and, of course, letting go of rebekah brooks and his long time lieutenant les hinton. >> on a personal level for murdoch and especially his son, are they in some sort of legal jeopardy? >> james murdoch has got to be the focus right now. because of course rebecca brooks and les hinton both having been gone, james murder okay runs news international. he has the number three position at the company, essentially, after chase carey, an execut
? the only response we got was, "she's safe." >> reporter: anthony's safety has been a big concern to those around her. her attorneys say she's gotten death threats. she's been vilified online. even at the sight where little caylee's remains were found, there was anger mixed in with the mourning today. >> to remember the crime that someone is yet to pay for. >> reporter: that anger may leave anthony paying in other ways. for high security. though she left the jail with just $537.68 from her commissary account. some say a paid interview, movie or book deal may not be far behind. for now, out of sight, but perhaps unlikely to stay out of the spotlight for long. >> i'm just ready for it all to end. i would like to see something else on my television. >> reporter: of course, there are others who can't wait to get their first glimpse of casey anthony in her new life. tonight, lester, no one is saying where she's spending her first full day of freedom. >> kristen, thank you. >>> you didn't have to be a soccer fan or even fully understand the game to be caught up in the drama that took place a sho
in to the secrets of the famous and the ordinary. and it's getting bigger by the day, despite a trip by the big boss to london to do some damage control. nbc's stephanie gosk is covering for us tonight in london. stephanie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. well the editors of the news of the world wrote in their final edition that we have won for today, a scandal that threatens the influence and power of one of the largest media companies. rupert murdock rushed to london hoping to mitigate the damage to his media empire, but it's looking more and more like there's little he can do. today new allegations reported in the british press and claims that one of the officers protecting the royals sold a list of the family's phone numbers to the news of the world. and a source close to prime minister gordon brown alleges that the sunday times, another murdock paper illegally pursued brown's private financial and medical information. anger at murdock and resentment over his media company's unchecked political clout is boiling over. >> there is an element about all this is that personal. gordon
that it's summer we're stuck in an active and persistent summer pattern with a big ridge of high pressure entrenched over the middle part of the country. the good news is we have relief on the way for the northeast by the end of the week. the jet stream and cooler air comes in from the north. however, by the time we head into the weekend that heat, the 90s and the triple digits, building back into the northern plains so no relief in sight at all for much of the south, in particular, the southern plains and, ann, keep in mind we're coming up on what's typically the hottest time of the year and that's july. >> thanks for the warning. >>> in washington, where the prospect of a major deal on raising the debt ceiling and fix the country's budget problems seems to be slipping away. chief white house correspondent chuck todd now joins us. chuck? >> reporter: ann, it wasn't the heat, it was the debt ceiling here in washington. lots of heated rhetoric. it got ugly and even a bizarre proposal in congress that could be a back doorway to solve the crisis. here's the president in an interview with cbs
on his caucus is put to test in standoff. feel like you're being tested? >> it is a test. this is a big step, trying to get control of our deficit and our debt and trying to do it by the august 2nd deadline. so it is a big test. >> some people who are friends of yours have said this isn't fair. your job is to run your party. but there is another party in there too. you have this tea party caucus that didn't come to washington with the same values. >> it is not the tea party caucus. most of the freshmen are frankly in pretty good shape. it would be more what i would describe as some hard-line conservatives who want more. i don't blame them. i want more too. but this was an agreement between the bipartisan senate leaders and myself. it is what's doable. and i think we can get there. >> mr. speaker, is it fair to say you have a bit of a rebellion on your hands? or do you feel -- >> i've got a little rebellion on my hands every day. it comes with the territory. >> you're not worried. >> never let them see you sweat. >> i'm disappointed. i care about john boehner. i think he's a good person.
revenue, but drop rates. and there would have also been big changes to the entitlement programs, cuts to medicare, that kind of thing. very serious stuff. they say that they had to walk away and will try to come up with a deal with senate leaders this weekend. lester? >> all right, kelly, thanks. to david gregory, a moderator of "meet the press." david, you're watching all this play out. it looked this morning as if it was the president getting heat for perhaps working -- getting heat from democrats for perhaps working a deal that would put off the whole revenue question for now. so what happened here? >> well, you had days of drama and then an afternoon of drama as kelly's been reporting. this appeared to be on one track and then did derail. one republican aide described it to me as a fish or cut bait moment, they had to get something done by monday and it is simply not there. the politics are nasty and enflamed as you saw. but the big deal here is the u.s. economy on the brink, lester. there is already widespread fear throughout washington that america's debt rating could be downgra
. the city of big spring is so desperate for water, it's building a plant to recycle its sewage. >> the quality of water that we're going to be producing from the production facility is essentially water that you could deliver to somebody's path. >> reporter: fresh or not, for now it's the only water in sight as the dry texas wind brings no rain. charles hadlock, nbc news, big spring, texas >>> in the horn of africa, refugees from somalia continue to flee the famine in that country today, pouring into unicef relief camps in ethiopia and kenya in search of food and shelter. president obama met this week with the presidents of four african nations calling for a greater international response. >>> when nbc nightly news continues, this saturday, was today a turning point for the american college student convicted of murder in italy? and later, another royal wedding day in britain. but for will and kate, this time the pressure was off. transitions adapt to changing light so you see your whole day comfortably... and conveniently while protecting your eyes from the sun. ask your eyecar
in three stages through next year. >>> a once big brand name is no more. borders book store chain said today it will liquidate after failing to find a buyer. they're closing all 400 retail stores. all of borders nearly 11,000 employees will now lose their jobs. >>> and technology giant cisco systems announced it's eliminating 6,500 jobs, part of an efficiency move. that's 9% of the workforce. that's in cisco's effort to cut $1 billion in annual costs to the company. >>> this was the last day in afghanistan for america's best-known general, david petraeus, who transferred command of u.s. and nato-led troops in that country today to his replacement, general john allen. a west point graduate with a princeton phd, easily the most celebrated modern day general officer is leaving to run the cia as the u.s. prepares for a gradual drawdown from afghanistan. >>> when we come back here tonight, new research is on head injuries, dementia and alzheimer's, and the group that researchers are most concerned about tonight. >>> they may have come up short in the end, but u.s. team is still american ido
and it is simply not there. the politics are nasty and enflamed, as you saw. but the big deal here is the u.s. economy on the brink, lester. there is already widespread fear throughout washington that america's debt rating could be downgraded if the deal is too small. and now we're at a point of talking about no deal at all. the president saying, i don't want a temporary solution. republicans saying, he may have to live with that based on the cuts they have already agreed to. >> treasury department says we have 11 days to get this done. what is the likelihood that the house leaders speaking directly with the senate could come up with something in that time frame? >> there are ways to do this but it comes down to the t word, taxes, tax increases. can there be a balanced plan as the president wants? they're both going to go against the line here to say you can't pass this, we have got to avoid default. but what is it going to take do that? again, i think you'll see republicans looking for a smaller term deal. the president saying, no, it has to be something that extends past the election or w
] and this is to remind you that you could save hundreds! yeah, that'll certainly stick with me. we'll take it. go, big money! i mean, go. it's your break, honey. same coverage, more savings. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> to find and nurture talent is to give a gift that can change lives. in cuba's capital city, one of that country's brightest stars is doing just that. a dancer giving hope to the children of the barrio. nbc's mark potter has our making a difference report. >> reporter: in a desperately poor havana neighborhood at a crumbling palace once home to the u.s. cavalry during the spanish-american war, there is now music and grace amid dreams of glory in the spotlight. molding those dreams is a member of cuba's artistic royalty. she is dancer and coach laura alonzo, the daughter of legendary ballerina alicia alonzo, now sharing her passion with thousands of cuba's poor. >> this is where i can do more good. this is where it will -- the good work is. >> reporter: 15 years ago alonzo opened central prodanza, a barrio dance school that welcomes everyone, no matter their race, si
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)